Transit Advisory Commission seeks new members

Have A Say LogoDo you ride transit and have a desire to improve transit service for everyone? King County is seeking several new members for its Transit Advisory Commission.

The commission helps improve transit services, planning, and programs by advising Metro, King County, and leaders about transit policy (visit the website to learn more).

The commission’s members include residents and other transit stakeholders. Our goal is to reflect the county’s diversity. Most members ride the bus, and all live in King County. Each serves a two-year term. The commission meets monthly or as needed.

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

In particular, we encourage people who live in the third, sixth, seventh, eighth, or ninth county council district (see a map); young people; people of color; and people with disabilities or limited English proficiency to apply.

Learn more and apply online.

La Comisión de asesoría de transporte público colectivo (Transit Advisory Commission) busca nuevos miembros

Have-a-Say-Spanish-500pwide¿Utiliza usted el transporte público y desea mejorar el servicio para todos? King County busca nuevos miembros para su Comisión asesora.

La comisión ayuda a mejorar los servicios de transporte, planificación y programas, asesorando a Metro, a King County y a líderes acerca de la política de transporte público (visite el sitio web para más información).

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Entre los miembros de la comisión se encuentran residentes y otras partes interesadas en el transporte público. Nuestro objetivo es reflejar la diversidad del condado. La mayoría de los miembros usa transporte público, y viven en el condado de King. Cada miembro se compromete en participar por dos años. La comisión se reúne mensualmente o según sea necesario.

Photo by Ned Ahrens, King County

Photo by Ned Ahrens, King County

En particular, invitamos a inscribirse a las personas que viven en el tercer, sexto, séptimo o noveno distritos municipales del condado (ver mapa); a los jóvenes; a personas de color; y a las personas con discapacidades o dominio limitado del Inglés.

Obtenga más información y complete su solicitud en línea.


How’s our translation? If you speak English and Spanish and want to help us improve our translations, compare this post to the same post we made in English and share your feedback by emailing community.relations@kingcounty.gov.

Transit service connections, reroutes for Fourth of July celebrations

MetroFireworksAvatar_largeFourth of July daytime parades and nighttime firework shows are planned across King County, and are expected to draw tens of thousands of people. As you explore how to get to these events using transit, please review planned reroutes and service adjustments that are scheduled to be in place for the holiday. We also have some tips for how to get home after the big show on Lake Union.

In observance of Independence Day on Monday, July 4, Metro Transit will operate a Sunday schedule, with 25 additional buses put in service following the major fireworks display at Lake Union. Metro offices, including the Customer Information office and the Lost and Found, will be closed.  If a Metro bus route does not normally operate on Sunday, it will not operate on Independence Day.

Transit service Monday night following the Lake Union fireworks display
While crowds will trickle into the Gas Works Park area throughout the day for festivities, everyone is leaving at about the same time after the fireworks, leading to likely service delays and overloaded buses. Here is some information to help get you home:independence_day2

  • Ride routes 32 & 44 from the Wallingford area to the Link light rail University of Washington Station; 10-15 minute service after 10:00 PM; Route 44 service until 2:00 AM; Route 32 will be rerouted between Stone Way N and the U-District.
  • To downtown Seattle, ride routes 5, 40 or 62 from the Fremont area; service operates about every 10-15 min until almost 1:00 AM.
  • From Aurora Av N, the RapidRide E Line operates to downtown every 15-30 minutes until about 2:00 AM.
  • Ride routes 26 & 40 to Northgate from Fremont and Wallingford respectively; service operates about every 30 minutes until about 1:30 AM; Route 26 will be rerouted off of NE 40th St.
  • Between downtown Seattle and the University District, ride Route 70 via Eastlake Av E; service about every 15 minutes until 1:00 AM; last trip northbound from downtown is 1:06 AM; last trip southbound from the University is 1:51 AM.
  • The South Lake Union Streetcar is operating additional trips after the fireworks display ends.
  • Additional buses will be used to mitigate overloads.

Other holiday transit service notes include: Continue reading

Starting May 23: Yesler Bridge project to change bus routes up to two years

Rt27ThumbnailThe City of Seattle’s Yesler Bridge project in downtown starts May 23, and Metro will be revising how routes 27, 33, 304, 355 and RapidRide D Line will get around for up to two years. Information about the project is on SDOT’s Yesler Bridge project page.

Several other routes may experience temporary delays as traffic is slowed near the construction area.

Fourth Avenue routes that may be affected at times include: 76, 77, 177, 178, 190, 252, 257, 268, 301, 308, 311, 312, 316, ST 522, ST 545, ST 554, Community Transit and Pierce Transit routes.RRDLineThumbnail

Fifth Avenue routes that may be affected at times include: 252, 257, 268, 304, 311, 355 and routes operated by Community Transit and Pierce Transit.

Other routes will face temporary weekend reroutes during the course of the project, which we will post online in our Service Advisories as information is available.

By signing up for transit alerts, riders can receive email or text message notifications when bus service will be rerouted. Click on images or see PDFs here: 27_yesler    304_355X_yesler    Yesler Bridge D line rerouteRt304355Thumbnail

(Scroll down to see what we sent to riders)

Transit Alert – Transit service will be rerouted off of Yesler Way & Terrace Street until fall of 2017 during the Yesler Bridge Rehabilitation Project

Starting Monday, May 23, transit service will be rerouted off of Yesler Way and Terrace Street until fall of 2017 during the Yesler Bridge Rehabilitation Project.

During this time, Metro routes 27, 33, 304 and 355, and the RapidRide D Line will be rerouted off of Yesler Way and Terrace Street between 3rd and 6th avenues.

Route 27 heading toward Colman Park will travel instead via eastbound James St, southbound 6th Av and to its regular routing via eastbound Yesler Way. Use posted stops on 3rd Av north of Marion St, on James St east of 3rd or 5th avenues, or on Yesler Way east of 6th Av.

Heading toward downtown Seattle, routes 27 and 33 will travel via southbound 6th Av S, westbound S Main St, northbound 4th Av S, Prefontaine Pl S, and on to the regular routing via northbound 3rd Av. Use posted stops on westbound Yesler Way east of 7th Av, southbound 6th Av S south of Yesler Way, or northbound on 3rd Av just south of James St.

Routes 304 and 355 heading toward Shoreline or Richmond Beach will travel via eastbound S Washington St to their regular routing on northbound 5th Av. Use posted stops on southbound 3rd Av north of Cherry St, eastbound S Washington St west of 4th Av S or northbound on 5th Av south of James St.

Heading toward downtown Seattle, Routes 304 and 355 will travel via southbound 5th Av, westbound S Main St, northbound 4th Av S and Prefontaine Pl S, to the regular routing on northbound 3rd Av. No stops are missed.  Use all regularly posted stops for these routes.

The RapidRide D Line heading into downtown Seattle will travel via James St to its regular route on southbound 5th Av. Use posted stops on 3rd Av north of James St or on James St east of 3rd Avenue.

Heading toward Ballard, the RapidRide D Line will operate via its normal route and will serve all regularly posted stops.

Visit the Service Advisories page for specific reroute information. Transit reroute start and end times may be subject to change.

Visit Metro’s Online Regional Trip Planner to find out how to get to and from events and locations.

Thank you for riding and for using Metro’s services.

Rally at Westlake Park celebrates 25 years of Americans with Disabilities Act

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Braille and raised text identify Metro coaches for riders.

On Wednesday, July 22, our community is celebrating the 25th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act with a rally 4-6 p.m. at Westlake Park in downtown Seattle underscoring the positive changes created by the ADA. Transit service will take people to and from the event and we extend the invitation to riders to mark the occasion and join in the celebration.MetroHistoryDisability_19 MetroHistoryDisability_20 MetroHistoryDisability_5

People living with disabilities or who use wheelchairs and other mobility devices ride Metro each and every day, enjoying the freedom the transit system supports. Decades ago, before ADA, Metro pioneered the use of specialized lifts to support riders who use wheelchairs, opening up a world of transit access previously unavailable.

Systems to make riding better for those with disabilities continue to evolve. We make stop announcements for the sight impaired, and ensure that our website and online timetables work with screen readers. Recently, Metro’s Transit Advisory Commission – which represents concerns of all riders, including those living with disabilities – asked Metro to install tactile coach numbers on the inside of our buses. We’re installing these on our fleet – both braille and raised numbers – and by taking this step, we further assist riders who are blind and support their independence.

These measures demonstrate Metro’s continuing commitment to making transit accessible for everyone. The 25th anniversary is an opportunity for us to mark the success we’ve achieved and recommit ourselves to continuing improvements that better serve riders with disabilities.

Transit Advisory Commission seeks new members

Have A Say LogoDo you ride transit and have a desire to improve transit service for everyone? King County is seeking several new members for its Transit Advisory Commission.

The commission helps improve transit services, planning, and programs by advising Metro, King County, and leaders about transit policy (visit the website to learn more).

The commission’s members include residents and other transit stakeholders. Our goal is to reflect the county’s diversity. Most members ride the bus, and all live in King County. Each serves a two-year term. The commission meets monthly or as needed.

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

In particular, we encourage people who live in the third, sixth, seventh, or ninth county council district (see a map); young people; people of color; and people with disabilities or limited English proficiency to apply.

Learn more and apply online.

La Transit Advisory Commission (Comisión de asesoría de transporte público colectivo) busca nuevos miembros

Have-a-Say-Spanish-500pwide¿Utiliza usted el transporte público y desea mejorar el servicio para todo el mundo? El King County busca nuevos miembros para su Comisión asesora.

La comisión ayuda a mejorar los servicios de transporte, planificación y programas, asesorando a Metro, al King County y a líderes acerca de la política de transporte público (visite el sitio web para más información).

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Photo courtesy Ned Ahrens, KCDOT

Entre los miembros de la comisión se encuentran residentes y otras partes interesadas en el transporte público. Nuestro objetivo es reflejar la diversidad del condado. La mayoría de los miembros viajan en autobús, y viven en el condado de King. Cada uno tiene un mandato de dos años. La comisión se reúne mensualmente o según sea necesario.

Photo by Ned Ahrens, King County

Photo by Ned Ahrens, King County

En particular, alentamos a inscribirse a las personas que viven en el tercer, sexto, séptimo o noveno distritos municipales del condado (ver mapa); a los jóvenes; a la gente de color; y a las personas con discapacidades o dominio limitado del Inglés.

Obtenga más información y ponga su solicitud en línea.


How’s our translation? If you speak English and Spanish and want to help us improve our translations, compare this post to the same post we made in English and share your feedback by emailing community.relations@kingcounty.gov.

Join us in honoring October’s Disability Awareness Month

1311_3505L_MetroCourtesyAds_3 (2)

You may have seen these ads on your bus already. They started appearing last month as part of Metro’s “We are Metro” courtesy campaign inspired by the Transit Advisory Commission.

This October, we invite you to join us in recognizing Disability Awareness Month. We are proud to continue a campaign we started a year ago: We are Metro – Community driven! The diversity of people who use and operate Metro’s services is one of the things that makes our Metro community great. Recent bus cuts and an unmet demand for more service mean that now more than ever, how we treat each other can make or break our transit experience.

What can you do to help?
Having your fare ready when you board or using an ORCA card can be your way of keeping the bus moving. Understand that a customer with limited mobility may take a little longer to pay fare. Thank the bus driver. Offer a priority seat to a fellow customer. Help a parent stow away a stroller. Keep what you bring on board with you from blocking the aisle whether it is a pet, a mobility device or a suitcase. Keep your music and cell phone conversations to yourself. There are lots of things we can do to make the bus ride a good experience.

Join our growing community

Sign up to receive emails about Metro accessibility. Join more than 11,400 people to learn about things such as changes to affect customers with disabilities and opportunities to provide feedback on accessibility issues.

We invite you to share your stories and pictures…

  • here on the blog
  • tweet us at @kcmetrobus
  • post on Metro Facebook, or
  • simply add the hashtag #WeAreMetro to any social media post.

Share with others what you observe others doing or what you do to make sure your fellow riders have a good experience.

This month the Metro Matters blog will be highlighting existing programs and tools to make our services easier to access. Metro has a long history of working to make sure that services are accessible, no one is left behind and all of us have a better ride. Thanks for joining us in making Metro a community that works for all of us.

Editor’s note: the Transit Advisory Commission are Metro customers appointed by the King County Council to advise Metro on your behalf. We represent all the county council districts and half of us represent customers with disabilities. Would you be interested in joining us? To learn more about the Commission or to apply to be a member visit the Transit Advisory Commission website. We Are Metro!

New video: Rider gives tips on riding Metro with a wheelchair

Metro is always looking for new and better ways to help you get where you need to go, and riders are key in giving us insight and feedback about our services.

With help from Saan, who rides Metro using a wheelchair, and Paul, a Metro transit operator, we have a new video to highlight the best practices for using mobility devices on transit.

Paul said he was proud to team up with Saan to help introduce riders to the accommodations Metro provides for mobility devices. “It was an opportunity to play a part in welcoming passengers and hopefully putting them at ease with the boarding procedures,” Paul said.

Thanks guys for your help in making a great video! If you have an idea for a video that could help people learn about our services, let us know. Or if you have other questions about riding the bus, check out our other information.

We Are Metro – Community Driven!

Editor’s Note: October is Disability Awareness Month, and as a national pioneer in providing accessible bus service Metro Transit celebrates and reaffirms its commitment to providing safe and accessible service for all riders. King County’s transit culture is strong and growing. We Are Metro – Community Driven! Thanks to our Metro Transit Advisory Commission for guest blogging this week!

The Metro Transit Advisory Commission – Metro customers appointed by the King County Council to advise Metro on your behalf. Half of us represent districts and half of us represent customers with disabilities.

The Metro Transit Advisory Commission – Metro customers appointed by the King County Council to advise Metro on your behalf. We represent all the county council districts and half of us represent customers with disabilities.

This October, King County Metro is celebrating Disability Awareness Month with a campaign called We Are Metro. When we work together, more of us can get to our destinations safely and on time. Whether we are young, old, Hispanic, gay, straight or blind. Metro has a long history of working to make sure that services are accessible, no one is left behind and all of us have a better ride. Ramps rather than stairs, flip up seats to keep aisles clear and automated stop information announcements so you don’t miss your stop.

Accessible equipment is just the start. What each rider does on the bus can make a better transit service for us all. Having your fare ready when you board or using an ORCA card can be your way of keeping the bus moving. Having patience when a customer with limited mobility who takes a little longer to pay fare lowers their anxiety and maybe your blood pressure! Thanking the bus driver. Offering a priority seats to a fellow customer. Keeping what you bring on board with you from blocking the aisle whether it is a pet, a mobility device or a suitcase. There are lots of things we can do to make the bus ride a good experience.

Though we speak with separate voices, we come together to form a brighter chorus that represents a common vision. And that is what this campaign is all about – working together.

Now we want to hear your story. Share your stories and pictures here on the blog, tweet us at @kcmetrobus or post on Metro Facebook, or simply add the hashtag #WeAreMetro to any social media post. Share with others how you use Metro and what you do to make sure your fellow riders have a good experience. Have you seen a driver or rider helping make the ride better? We want to hear about that too!

New!

Sign up to receive emails about Metro accessibility, including changes likely to affect customers with disabilities and opportunities to provide feedback on accessibility issues.

This month the Metro Matters blog will be highlighting what Metro does to make our services easier to access. Blog posts over the next couple of weeks will cover:

  • History of accessibility at Metro – Did you know that we were one of the first transit agencies to have accessible buses? We started purchasing buses with lifts in 1979 and all of our fleet was accessible by 1999.
  • Learning how to use transit – riding the bus with a disability means learning to use the accessible equipment and safety and riding tips. Metro offers free training to individuals and groups.
  • Driver support – Metro drivers are out there every day to keep us moving. We’ll talk about what we are doing to help our drivers when they are out there on the road.
  • Have Your Say – Metro staff is continually working to make it easier to access our services. Our final blog post of the month will give an opportunity for customers to provide input on what we should focus on next.

Would you be interested in joining us? To learn more about the Commission or to apply to be a member visit the Transit Advisory Commission website. We Are Metro!