Route 99 is leaving First Avenue

Route 99, which serves First Avenue in downtown Seattle, will be relocated later this summer or early this fall when the Seattle Department of Transportation begins construction on the new Center City Connector Streetcar.

A popular route for visitors during the summer, Route 99 currently travels along First Avenue between Broad Street and South Jackson Street, and along South Jackson Street between First Avenue and Interstate 5. During the summer, it runs seven days a week, all day long. The rest of the year it runs only during peak commute hours.

When construction begins, Route 99 will move to Third Avenue for northbound trips and Second Avenue for southbound trips.

Metro is proposing to eliminate the route next March. There are many alternative bus routes on Third Avenue for riders to choose from, and the new streetcar is scheduled to begin serving First Avenue in 2020. Metro will consider ideas for future transit service in the area at that time.

We invite riders and stakeholders to take this online survey and tell us your thoughts on this proposed change and other ideas for future transit service in the area. The deadline is July 16.
RT99Map
Metro initially considered moving Route 99 to Western Avenue instead of Third Avenue, but found road conditions on Western unable to support bus service. Also, congestion around the Pike Place Market would likely affect reliability.

New Belltown stops proposed

To help riders who would be affected by lost service in Belltown, Metro is proposing to add a new pair of stops on Broad Street at the intersections of First Avenue and Second Avenue. These would connect to service between Belltown and Pioneer Square.

Metro invites riders to share their feedback and ideas for future transit service in the area through an online survey, open through July 16.

3 thoughts on “Route 99 is leaving First Avenue

  1. The waterfront streetcar would be perfect for the redesigned waterfront once the viaduct is gone. Much of the old streetcar infrastructure is still present (tracks and stations), so it would not take as much investment to reinstate it as building a new line on Alaska Way would.

  2. I don’t understand why Metro is not reusing the old structures of the Waterfront Streetcar instead of building the glass and steel shelters. They look very historic, which tourists really like.

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